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Millennials Overlook Principles in Favor of More Sophisticated Technology When Selecting Financial Services Providers: Study

(PRWEB) May 28, 2014

Credit unions are failing to engage millennials online, a new research study on digital behavior of millennials and financial services shows, revealing a key reason why millennials are the least likely demographic to become credit union members despite sharing common values. In financial services, digital convenience and pragmatism prevails over loyalty or belief-based decision making.

Digital Fieldwork, a digital audience research company focused on the channels, culture and content that drive digital behavior, revealed today why 18- to 34-year-olds in the U.S. are less likely to select credit unions as their financial services provider. This is primarily due to a lack of awareness about credit unions and a perception that they are not up on the latest technology. The report’s findings debunk a commonly held belief that millennials’ consumer purchasing decisions are driven by their values.

“Millennials are very pragmatic and have high expectations around technology,” said Laurie Paleczny, co-founder of Digital Fieldwork, who noted that the research examined thousands of online data points, including publicly available profiles on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. “If convenience and functionality aren’t there, they’ll do business with banks even if they do not always respect their values.”

Paleczny said that the report, “Strangers in the Night: Credit Unions, Millennials and Digital Behavior,” offers other important insights for financial service marketers:

Strangers, not friends — Millennials do not seek or desire financial advice on Facebook, and credit unions are more successful with member engagement through posts about local news, sports teams, charity causes or even financial literacy programs.
Giving Twitter the business — The majority of credit union followers on Twitter are industry stakeholders, not customers, which suggests it is not an effective way to court millennials.
Prefer to remain anonymous — Blogs and forums are far more influential with millennials seeking financial advice than Facebook or Twitter.
Money mobilized — Millennials want to do business on mobile devices and credit unions have opportunity to partner and integrate with popular mobile personal finance apps.
Positively confused — Online attitudes are highly negative toward banks and generally positive toward credit unions, but confusion persists about their differences.

Altimeter Group noted in their recent report on content marketing software that 67% of marketers identify audience identification and targeting as a top need, yet only 25% were investing in this area,” said Paleczny. “It’s a big miss. Our research shows how credit union marketing tactics are mismatched to the behavior of a key audience, which reflects a common issue in marketing today.”

“Financial services providers in particular need to go beyond demographics to really understand their audience’s digital behavior,” added Paleczny, a former financial services executive. “It’s critical for them to learn how to participate in online channels and platforms where millennials are having financial discussions.”

The 53-page report is based on research conducted between January and April 2014 and provides a roadmap for financial services marketers to more effectively reach and engage millennials online. It was released on the Digital Fieldwork website on May 22 as part of an annual subscription.

Digital Fieldwork will hold weekly briefings beginning Thursday, May 29 at 2 p.m. ET to showcase the results. Media are invited to register to attend our briefing on May 29.

ABOUT DIGITAL FIELDWORK INC — Launched in April 2014, Digital Fieldwork Inc. combines over 150 of the most relevant and useful online data inputs including proprietary ethnography, search data, social media listening, social network data, content engagement, consumption and performance data, to help companies deeply understand the current information needs, behavior and culture of the digital audiences they are marketing to. Digital Fieldwork’s first report, “Strangers in the Night: Credit Unions, Millennials and Digital Behavior” is available on digitalfieldworkinc.com. Upcoming reports will focus on healthcare and enterprise software.

For more information about this topic, please contact Laurie Paleczny by calling or 888.795.0402, or email Laurie at laurie(at)digitalfieldworkinc(dot)com.







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Technology As a New Way to Learn More Words and Use Them the Right Way, eReflect Conveys Support


New York City, NY (PRWEB) May 12, 2014

While there are still some modern-day Luddites who shun technology, aspiring linguists should learn to embrace it. Technology can actually promote vocabulary increase in a second language, as long as those technological language tools are used wisely and constructively, eReflect observed today. Before tablets and smartphones become widely used, students relied on their teachers, classmates, or dictionaries for help in understanding a word’s meaning. Today students use mobile apps and Google Translate, or sift through Google search results to find out the meaning, definition, or subtle semantics of words and phrases.

Sometimes, however, either because of laziness or lack of proper guidance, many learners of foreign languages abuse technological tools such as Google Translate when completing their assignments. For instance, instead of using online dictionaries and translation tools to find the meaning of words, students might write an essay in their mother tongue and then translate it into the language they’re learning. This is not the best way to help build vocabulary, and this passive method is not an efficient way to improve the student’s language mastery because they don’t actually engage with that language’s vocabulary in a way will allow them to use it in writing and speech confidently.

An educator needs to make this explicit, saying something like, “If you want to build your vocabulary, you need to actively work on it.” A teacher can offer instructions on the best use of technological tools and online resources for driving forward the student’s learning, while warning them against the use of technology in ways that sabotages their progress. Finally, teachers need to ensure that students can handle such technologies with ease, and not feel overwhelmed by their complexity.

eReflect, developer of the vocabulary builder software, Ultimate Vocabulary™, also suggests that teachers can use technology to cultivate a love for language learning in students. The secret is to introduce them to the fun and playful aspect of tech-based learning, in the form of games and interesting online activities. Technology is overhauling education, and teachers need to smooth the way for students so that they have an easy and successful path towards a more fun-driven learning model.

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More Than 80% of Florida Students Are Not Prepared for College Summer Programs May Offer Help


Orlando, Florida (PRWEB) February 27, 2014

Only 18% of high school students are prepared to face the rigorous demands of college, according to an ACT Florida Profile Report. Summer enrichment programs are one way that parents are helping their teens prepare better, focusing on academics, social and communication skills.

SuperCamp, an academic, life and career skills camp, is holding programs at the University of South Florida this summer to help teens improve grades, confidence and motivation. “It’s about helping students discover that learning can be fun, which leads to intrinsic motivation,” says President Bobbi DePorter. “More students are applying to top colleges than ever before. They need to know how they learn best and gain powerful strategies that help them excel.”

Even top-performing students may find themselves unprepared. Many students with academic talent coast through middle and high school, earning A’s with little to no effort, says DePorter. When they go to college and find work that challenges them, their work ethic and study habits often aren’t sufficient to succeed.

Researchers from the CRIS initiative argue that college readiness extends far beyond academic success. Determining success rates among students, they insist, requires new and different ways to measure college readiness that extend beyond test scores and grades. 40% of high school students are chronically disengaged from school, and confidence and motivation are often overlooked.

Carol Hall, a Miami mom that sent her son to SuperCamp in 2012 and 2013, was skeptical at first. “I had no idea how effective it would be. But at graduation, I knew that something was different in the smile he gave me. I took a deep breath, stepped back and have been letting him lead the way ever since. The change in him is remarkable and I recommend it to all the parents I know.”

About SuperCamp

SuperCamp is the world’s leading academic and life skills summer camp. For more than 30 years, SuperCamp has helped students increase their grades, confidence and motivation. SuperCamp has made a difference in the lives of over 70,000 graduates worldwide, with 73% of students improving grades, 81% experiencing increased confidence and an average 100-point increase on SAT scores. Florida sessions for middle and high schoolers run from July 14-20 and July 23-August 1.

Contact:

Mariah Gillespie

SuperCamp

760-722-0072 x 171

Download Free Special Report







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More Than Half of Illinois Students Are Not Prepared For College Summer Programs May Offer Help


Chicago, Illinois (PRWEB) February 10, 2014

Only 46% of high school students are prepared to face the rigorous demands of college, according to the Illinois State Board of Education. Summer enrichment programs are one way that parents are helping their teens prepare better, focusing on academics, social and communication skills.

SuperCamp, an academic, life and career skills camp, is holding programs at Loyola University Chicago this summer to help teens improve grades, confidence and motivation. “It’s about helping students discover that learning can be fun, which leads to intrinsic motivation,” says President Bobbi DePorter. “More students are applying to top colleges than ever before. They need to know how they learn best and gain powerful strategies that help them excel. ”

Even top-performing students may find themselves unprepared. Many students with academic talent coast through middle and high school, earning A’s with little to no effort, says DePorter. When they go to college and find work that challenges them, their work ethic and study habits often aren’t sufficient to succeed.

Researchers from the CRIS initiative argue that college readiness extends far beyond academic success. Determining success rates among students, they insist, requires new and different ways to measure college readiness that extend beyond test scores and grades. 40% of high school students are chronically disengaged from school, and confidence and motivation are often overlooked.

Craig McKenna, a SuperCamp graduate from Hinsdale, says that he left the program feeling better about his relationships and better about himself. “I met some incredible people who pushed me to a level I never thought existed in me,” he says. “If you want to learn how to succeed in life, this is the place to be.”

About SuperCamp

SuperCamp is the world’s leading academic and life skills summer camp. For more than 30 years, SuperCamp has helped students increase their grades, confidence and motivation. SuperCamp has made a difference in the lives of over 70,000 graduates worldwide, with 73% of students improving grades, 81% experiencing increased confidence and an average 100-point increase on SAT scores. Chicago sessions for middle and high schoolers run from July 14-20 and July 23-August 1.

Contact:

Mariah Gillespie

SuperCamp

760-722-0072 x 171

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